corporate wellness

The future of wellness, published in Corporate Wellness Magazine

I have another piece in Corporate Wellness Magazine, this time a reported piece despite its having been labeled a column.

Headlined "The Future of Wellness," it asks wellness leaders at Southwest Airlines, L.L.Bean, and other companies what they're trying to achieve, and what's working for them. The story posted a while ago, but I realized this morning that I never shared it here. 

It's good. You should read it. 


Privacy? We surrendered on that a while ago

One of the complaints levied against wellness programs is that companies are asking for too much information, and via devices that track sleep, movement, and other data, are in a position to know even more.

It’s a violation of privacy, the faulters fume, and it is, at least, a loss of privacy. It’s only a violation if one is required to use such a device, or is coerced into “choosing” to.


Virgin Pulse is habit-forming

In this overpaced, overscheduled, over-expectational world, would you be willing to invest 30 minutes if you could gain a couple of hours of productivity?

That’s one of the questions Virgin Pulse CEO Chris Boyce posed during his main-stage address at his company’s Thrive Summit 2015 this morning. He was talking about exercise: 70 percent of people don’t get the recommended 30 minutes a day, and the lack leads to 23 percent decline in cognitive ability for the rest of the day, he said.


"I don't see no problem here," or "Let them eat fruit"?

In the most recent post, we were enjoying author Andre Spicer’s interview with a very sympathetic editor at Harvard Business Review. Spicer is co-author of “The Wellness Syndrome,” a run-of-the-mill dog-bites-man tale that argues that corporate wellness programs not only don’t help, they harm.

I saved his last answer for this post. It is:


Al Lewis can't help it if all his targets are liars

Firebrand Al Lewis is relentlessly snide in his prosecution of corporate wellness in the public dock. His blog posts refer to the “self-described experts” of the “wellness ignorati” who produced a report he picks on, and then mocks a critic who says that calling people ignorant and liars is bullying.


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