Lifestyle

The doctor replies again: Once obese, it's tough to escape

You probably know that I've been in conversation with Dr. Christopher Ochner, and this is probably the last installment in that conversation. I expect we'll continue to be in touch, but this exchange has been pleasingly unusual and I don't know that we'll approximate it. Please give Chris a hand for engaging on these points. I am.]

By Dr. Christopher Ochner


Is it biology? Lifestyle? Why not both (and more)?

I foreshadowed this post last week, when I began my ripostes to Dr. Chris Ochner, a good guy and respected researcher on obesity, a particular interest of mine. I just want to emphasize, again, that this isn’t about Ochner; it’s about ideas that are well evident in public debate. Our interview, and the aftermath, have provided opportunities for further discussion.


CBS goes for the fat jokes

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I wanted to acknowledge, but not spend too much time on, "Mike and Molly," a sitcom CBS has purchased for the fall. I watched its clip online and it appears it will be very much like pretty much every other sitcom, with extra fat jokes thrown in.

Fat jokes are a sitcom staple, of course, but usually they've come from the nebbishy fat guy, or the brassy fat woman. But Mike and Molly meet in an Overeaters Anonymous meeting, and hilarity ensues from there. Presumably.


Personal growth

The old box, the trellis, and the new box

The Globe's Sam Allis trotted out a perennial for his column yesterday, which leaves little doubt of its direction from the opening gun: "Red alert: the gardeners are back. Run to the attic and barricade the door. " You gotta respect the declarative sentence.


Eating trends

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Yeah, OK, so I've been MIA forever, and probably, that's likely to continue. Georgie's family leave ends today, and I'll be finally taking on the full reality of what I set out to do when I left the Globe almost three years ago — be the full-time caregiver for my child. (His name is Joe; you can view photos here if you want.)


"Employee activation"

I don't at all like the term in the headline, but I do like the concept, which describes companies' engage employees to adopt "PSPs," personal sustainability practices, that can benefit not only the planet and the individual, but foster common purpose in a workforce. 


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