dieting

"We need to show people how to retrain their brains so that what they enjoy eating is good for their weight."

Welcome to another episode of “10 Words or Less,” in which I ask brief questions of interesting people and request brief answers in return. Today’s participant is a professor at Tufts University in the subjects of nutrition and psychiatry, and director of the university’s Energy Metabolism Laboratory.


The murky meaning of "No Diet Day"

Today, May 6, is "No Diet Day." Like so many such events, it makes a point we should value every day, but don't, so we give it a "day" so that we'll make the point at least once a year.

But this one is different: Unlike, say, Mothers Day (it's Sunday, don't forget!) or Fathers Day, there is confusion about just what "No Diet Day" is recognizing.


The doctor replies again: Once obese, it's tough to escape

You probably know that I've been in conversation with Dr. Christopher Ochner, and this is probably the last installment in that conversation. I expect we'll continue to be in touch, but this exchange has been pleasingly unusual and I don't know that we'll approximate it. Please give Chris a hand for engaging on these points. I am.]

By Dr. Christopher Ochner


"I don't consider fatness a problem."

Welcome to another installment of "10 Words or Less," in which I put brief questions to interesting people and ask for brief answers in return. To be blunt, today's participant failed miserably — "I told you Michael, diets of any kind, even word diets, probably not going to work with me," she said afterward — but she has interesting things to say, and I'll take form over format any time. She is a northern California psychologist who works often with clients who have eating disorders.


"I don't consider fatness a problem."

Welcome to another installment of "10 Words or Less," in which I put brief questions to interesting people and ask for brief answers in return. To be blunt, today's participant failed miserably — "I told you Michael, diets of any kind, even word diets, probably not going to work with me," she said afterward — but she has interesting things to say, and I'll take form over format any time. She is a northern California psychologist who works often with clients who have eating disorders.


Diets don't work, but weight loss is possible

It is true that much of the commercial weight-loss industry is composed of charlatans who lack evidence to back up their come-ons. But that's not the same as saying that there is no way to reduce one's body size sustainably.

As you know, I did (am doing) it, and I have lots of friends who have as well. But there's also the long-term, legitimate, National Weight Control Registry, which is coming up on 20 years and tracks more than 10,000 people who've lost significant weight and kept it off for significant time.


What can the RD designation be worth?

[I originally published this post a year (and three days) ago, but I'm bumping it to the top because it fits the thread of discussion kindled by Michele Simon's Eat Drink Politics report of last week.]

Based on my early experience with them, and on what I've heard from others of their experiences, I have long held opprobrium for registered dietitians. But it has recently bubbled over again.


NPR reader decries McDonald's harassment, aka calorie labels

The Salt, NPR's food blog, carried the news today that McDonald's will beging posting calorie counts of its products, which is definitely news. This is what happens when groups like Corporate Accountability International organize the tens (hundreds?) of thousands of people who care about nutrition to apply enough pressure that even the most prominent corporations choose to change.


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